Skip to main content

Testimony of drug use highlights impaired driving causing death trial

There was emotional testimony on Monday from the husband of the woman killed in a crash in south London, Ont. almost four years ago.

Paul Kay testified about the last moments in the life of his 68-year-old wife, Penny.

Kay had been driving north along Highbury Avenue on Oct. 7, 2019 when a grey Hyundai sedan crossed the median and struck his Ford SUV head-on.

“It just happened instantaneously,” said Kay. “There was a loud bang and a white flash.”

Kay said when he turned to his wife she wasn’t breathing, “I watched to see if her chest was rising up and down.”

Kay told the court he is still dealing with injuries he suffered in the crash. He said he suffered a broken shoulder, eight broken ribs, internal injuries and a broken lower back.

After police arrived at the scene they arrested and charged Shawn Norris, 61.

Shawn Norris leaves the London, Ont. courthouse. (Nick Paparella/CTV News London)

At the start of the trial he pleaded not guilty to four charges including impaired driving by drugs causing death and careless driving causing death.

Earlier during the proceedings, Norris’ former partner testified and she told the court that the accused would frequently use her prescription drugs.

“I know he used prescription medications like Percocet and oxycodone,” said Christine Flint. “He really didn’t care he used my medications like they were his own.”

Flint told the court that on the day of the crash Norris was on his way to London from St. Thomas, Ont. to pick up methadone.

She said before he left Norris ingested quite a bit of her medications.

Dash cam video captured the crash and was submitted as evidence.

It shows a grey sedan crossing the median and crashing into an SUV in the middle of the day almost four years ago.

The trial resumes Tuesday and is expected to last the rest of the week.  

CTVNews.ca Top Stories

Ontario city home to Nazi soldier that visited Parliament shares mixed emotions

North Bay, Ont. is currently home to a man who was honoured with a standing ovation in the House of Commons during a visit from Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy, but whose presence in Parliament later caused global outrage and embarrassment when details emerged about his past as a Nazi soldier during the second World War.

Stay Connected